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photograph of people on a boat

Alfred Stieglitz (American, 1864 – 1946)
The Steerage, 1907

Photogravure
13” x 11”
Bank of America Collection

picture display with portraits of people

Walker Evans (American, 1903 – 1975)
Penny Picture Display, Savannah, 1936

1936 negative, printed c. 1936
Gelatin silver print
7 7/8” x 6 3/4”
Bank of America Collection

little girls with their hands to their hearts

Dorothea Lange (American, 1895 – 1965)
One Nation, Indivisible, San Francisco, 1942

1942 negative, posthumous print 1967
Gelatin silver print
8 3/4" × 6 1/2"
Bank of America Collection

ancient ruins in a canyon

Timothy H. O’Sullivan (American, 1840 – 1882)
Cañon de Chelle, 1873

1873 negative
Albumen silver print
8” x 10 7/8”
Bank of America Collection

catherdral

William Henry Fox Talbot (British, 1800 – 1877)
Orléans Cathedral, 1843

1843 negative and print
Calotype
7” x 8”
Bank of America Collection

person playing instrument with american flag in background

Robert Frank (American, born Switzerland, 1924)
Political Rally, Chicago, 1956

1956 negative       
Gelatin silver print
18” x 12”
Bank of America Collection

Photograph © Robert Frank

torn paper on wall

Aaron Siskind (American 1903 – 1991)
Rome, 55, 1963

1963 negative
Gelatin silver print
19” x 15”
Bank of America Collection

© 2018 Aaron Siskind Foundation

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EXHIBITION ON VIEW

Moment in Time: A Legacy of Photographs
Works from the Bank of America Collection

Moment in Time: A Legacy of Photographs features 117 works by important, international photographers dating from the invention of the medium in the 1830s through the mid-twentieth century, from William Henry Fox Talbot, Julia Margaret Cameron and Timothy O’Sullivan to Paul Strand, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ansel Adams, Helen Levitt and Walker Evans.

The history and evolution of this photography collection is notable. It originates in the late 1960s, when the first corporate collection of photography in the United States emerged. At this time, the corporate environment was changing from formal settings to workspaces allowing freedom of movement and interaction with customers, and the art world was redefining itself and its relationship to photography as a fine art. At this historic juncture for the photographic art and business worlds, a pivotal collection in the history of photography was born.

Beaumont and Nancy Newhall were pioneering collectors and historians who became the first curators of the photography department at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in the 1940s. In 1967, they were commissioned by the president of the National Exchange Bank of Chicago, a legacy bank of Bank of America, to establish a corporate art collection focused solely on photography. The Newhalls continued to curate the Exchange Bank collection through 1972. Because of the bank’s location in Chicago, the city’s photographs comprised an important facet of the collection. The city was home to a talented group of photographers influenced by the New Bauhaus school founded by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy (later reopened as the Institute of Design). Aaron Siskind, Art Siegel and Harry Callahan all taught at the school, and Art Sinsabaugh was a student. All are represented in the collection.

In the years that followed, the Exchange Bank – and its groundbreaking collection, which continued to expand – were acquired several times, finally becoming part of Bank of America in 2008. The legacy of the original Newhall collection, marking a historic partnership between the art and business worlds and a landmark in photography, resonates to this day.

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EXHIBITION ON VIEW

Moment in Time: A Legacy of Photographs
Works from the Bank of America Collection

Moment in Time: A Legacy of Photographs features 117 works by important, international photographers dating from the invention of the medium in the 1830s through the mid-twentieth century, from William Henry Fox Talbot, Julia Margaret Cameron and Timothy O’Sullivan to Paul Strand, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ansel Adams, Helen Levitt and Walker Evans.

The history and evolution of this photography collection is notable. It originates in the late 1960s, when the first corporate collection of photography in the United States emerged. At this time, the corporate environment was changing from formal settings to workspaces allowing freedom of movement and interaction with customers, and the art world was redefining itself and its relationship to photography as a fine art. At this historic juncture for the photographic art and business worlds, a pivotal collection in the history of photography was born.

Beaumont and Nancy Newhall were pioneering collectors and historians who became the first curators of the photography department at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in the 1940s. In 1967, they were commissioned by the president of the National Exchange Bank of Chicago, a legacy bank of Bank of America, to establish a corporate art collection focused solely on photography. The Newhalls continued to curate the Exchange Bank collection through 1972. Because of the bank’s location in Chicago, the city’s photographs comprised an important facet of the collection. The city was home to a talented group of photographers influenced by the New Bauhaus school founded by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy (later reopened as the Institute of Design). Aaron Siskind, Art Siegel and Harry Callahan all taught at the school, and Art Sinsabaugh was a student. All are represented in the collection.

In the years that followed, the Exchange Bank – and its groundbreaking collection, which continued to expand – were acquired several times, finally becoming part of Bank of America in 2008. The legacy of the original Newhall collection, marking a historic partnership between the art and business worlds and a landmark in photography, resonates to this day.

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Political Rally, Chicago, 1956, Photograph © Robert Frank; Rome, 55, 1963, © 2018 Aaron Siskind Foundation

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