Closing the Achievement Gap for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Students

Jan 16, 2012

Video Transcript

Super: Denise Watts, Executive Director, Project LIFT
V/O (Denise Watts): Students don’t get to choose their ZIP code that they are born into. They don’t get to choose the situation and they don’t get to choose their parents. But it's up to the adults in the community to make sure that every child gets the same quality education experience and the same positive upbringing. We are one city.

Super: Charles Bowman, N.C. Market President, Bank of America
V/O (Bowman): Bank of America has always believed in investing in education. And Bank of America’s investment will really be a catalyst for Charlotte. We’re focusing on really trying to close the gaps that people have in education. So people don’t fall out of the system.

Super: Tonya Horton, Executive Director, Citizen Schools
V/O (Horton): Middle School is important because that’s where we lose a lot of kids. That’s where kids decide whether they want to continue with school or whether they want to drop out.

Super: Alison Harris, Principal, Ranson Middle School
V/O (Harris): When you are working with children who are impoverished or disenfranchised, they have to know that there is a world beyond their four corners, or beyond their corner store, or just their schoolhouse. They’ve got to know what to reach for.

Super: Melissa Dunlap, Principal, Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School
V/O (Dunlap): They don’t really know all that they are capable of doing until they are exposed to it. And so by being exposed to [a] variety of career opportunities, variety of people, they begin to know and discover who they really are.

V/O (Bowman): We sponsored programs that will not only serve young children coming up, but also some of the programs will be focused around educating teachers, making sure you have the best selection of people, some will be about providing after-school care, others will be about providing aid to students who want to come out of high school and go on to college.

V/O (Matthew): The only way you can be successful in today’s society is to really go to college. A lot of people around my age miss out on that opportunity because people don’t take the time to target the younger group that needs it the most.

Super: Thomas Kirkley, Teacher, Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School
V/O (Kirkley): Bank of America has been on the forefront of education for years and it just shows me that they are not just looking into the banking aspect of their company, but they are actually looking into molding an entire student.

Teacher in B-Roll: “Who’s Excited”

V/O (Bowman): Everybody benefits, the individual benefits who gets the help, the companies benefit, community benefits—there are no losers in this.

V/O (Dunlap): There is no other means of mechanism by which you can change a life than great education. When you invest in education, you equalize the playing field for everyone.

V/O (Bowman): And that’s one of the reasons I’m so passionate about what we can do in education and we can’t quit. We got to keep going and we gotta start early. You got to stay with it year after year, because how we do as a company is inextricably linked with how vibrant a community is that we live in.

Endcard: In 2011, we provided a $10 million grant to Project L.I.F.T., a community collaborative that will help close the achievement gap facing low-income students in Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools.

Legal: Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. © 2011


Open Location
Open How we're involved
Grants & Sponsorships
WHERE WE ARE
Bank of America has been on the forefront of education for years and it just shows me that they are not just looking into the banking aspect of their company, but they are actually looking into molding an entire student.

Thomas Kirkley
Teacher, Martin Luther King Jr., Middle School