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The Forty-Two Pound Squash

Sally Mann (American, b. 1951)
The Forty-Two Pound Squash, 1989

Gelatin silver print
20" × 24"

Stilleven Met Melk (Still Life with Milk)

Elspeth Diederix (Dutch, born Kenya, 1971)
Stilleven Met Melk (Still Life with Milk), 2002

Chromogenic print
68 1/2" × 59 1/2"

Untitled, 2000, from Japan Series Hellen van Meene (Dutch, b. 1972)

Hellen van Meene (Dutch, b. 1972)
Untitled, 2000, from Japan Series

Color coupler print, 2000
15 1/4" × 15 1/4"

Migrant mother

Dorothea Lange, (1895 - 1965)
Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936

Gelatin silver print
10” x 8”, Library of Congress

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EXHIBITION ON VIEW

Eye Wonder: women photographers in the Bank of America Collection

Since photography's inception in the mid-nineteenth century, women artists have embraced the subjectivity and eccentricity of the camera’s lens. They have not merely captured scenes but rather directed their models, devised inventive camera angles and expressive lighting, and manipulated color and focus as part of their creative image-making process.

Drawn from Bank of America¹s renowned collection of international photography, Eye Wonder covers works from the early days of the medium; by Modernist masters such as Berenice Abbott, Margaret Bourke-White and Ilse Bing; through works by contemporary innovators including Rineke Dijkstra, DoDo Jin Ming and Hellen van Meene. The exhibition's broad range of historical and contemporary works reveals the enduring complexity and richness of the photographic image.

The exhibition is organized thematically to illuminate how artists have created widely varied views of fundamental subjects such as the human face and figure, landscape, interior, or still life. Modernist photographers used the sharp boundaries of the camera¹s lens to accentuate the formal elements of shape, value and texture when photographing subjects ranging from flowers to factories. Documentary-style photographers may favor a straight, immediate method of shooting, but their emotional responses and aesthetic preferences mold their final images.

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EXHIBITION ON VIEW

Eye Wonder: women photographers in the Bank of America Collection

Since photography's inception in the mid-nineteenth century, women artists have embraced the subjectivity and eccentricity of the camera’s lens. They have not merely captured scenes but rather directed their models, devised inventive camera angles and expressive lighting, and manipulated color and focus as part of their creative image-making process.

Drawn from Bank of America¹s renowned collection of international photography, Eye Wonder covers works from the early days of the medium; by Modernist masters such as Berenice Abbott, Margaret Bourke-White and Ilse Bing; through works by contemporary innovators including Rineke Dijkstra, DoDo Jin Ming and Hellen van Meene. The exhibition's broad range of historical and contemporary works reveals the enduring complexity and richness of the photographic image.

The exhibition is organized thematically to illuminate how artists have created widely varied views of fundamental subjects such as the human face and figure, landscape, interior, or still life. Modernist photographers used the sharp boundaries of the camera¹s lens to accentuate the formal elements of shape, value and texture when photographing subjects ranging from flowers to factories. Documentary-style photographers may favor a straight, immediate method of shooting, but their emotional responses and aesthetic preferences mold their final images.

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The Forty-Two Pound Squash © Sally Mann. Courtesy Gagosian Gallery; Stilleven Met Melk (Still Life with Milk) Image courtesy of Galerie Diana Stigter; Untitled, 2000, from Japan Series, © Hellen van Meene

Eye wonder: women photographers in the Bank of America collection

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