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Damaged child

Dorothea Lange (American, 1895-1965)
A Damaged Child, Oklahoma, 1939

Gelatin silver print
9 5/8" x 7 5/8" (24.45 x 19.37 cm)

Child labor

Lewis Wickes Hine (American 1874 - 1940)
Child Labor - Textile Mill, 1908

Gelatin silver print, 1908 negative, 1967-68 print
5" x 7" (12.7 x 17.8 cm)

Irene

Meridel Rubenstein (American, b.1948)
Irene Jaramillo, San Juan Pueblo, '60 Ford LTD, from The Lowriders, Portraits from New Mexico, 1980

Color coupler print, 1979-1980 negative, 1980-1981 portfolio, print date unknown
6 3/4" x 9 1/2" (17.15 x 24.13cm)

Untitled

Julia Margaret Cameron (British, 1815-1879)
Untitled (May Prinsep), October 1870

Albumen silver print
14" x 10 3/8" (35.56 x 26.35 cm)

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EXHIBITION ON VIEW

Conversations: Photographs from the Bank of America Collection

Curated with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the exhibition features photographs grouped by broad themes— portraits, still lifes, landscapes, documentary images, street photography and experimental abstractions— to create visual conversations between photographs exhibited side by side. The curators have selected approximately 100 works, many of which are significant and rare. The comparisons are thought-provoking and encourage viewers to consider the range and diversity of photographers’ approaches over time. Nineteenth-century works are compared to modern and contemporary; the European aesthetic juxtaposed with the American; close-ups paired with distant views; unstaged versus posed; and abstractions alongside images of detailed documentation. To set the tone, a selection of images depicting the subject of people looking at art in museums—by Thomas Struth, Candida Höfer, Andreas Gursky and Robert Polidori—will greet visitors at the entrance to the gallery.

Among the photographers represented are Gustave Le Gray, Francis Firth, Julia Margaret Cameron, Roger Fenton, Eugène Atget, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, László Moholy-Nagy, Man Ray, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Irving Penn, Lee Friedlander, Garry Winogrand, Ed Ruscha, Joel Sternfeld, Cindy Sherman, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Tina Barney, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Vera Lutter, Vic Muniz, Richard Misrach, Stéphane Couturier and Alec Soth.

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EXHIBITION ON VIEW

Conversations: Photographs from the Bank of America Collection

Curated with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the exhibition features photographs grouped by broad themes— portraits, still lifes, landscapes, documentary images, street photography and experimental abstractions— to create visual conversations between photographs exhibited side by side. The curators have selected approximately 100 works, many of which are significant and rare. The comparisons are thought-provoking and encourage viewers to consider the range and diversity of photographers’ approaches over time. Nineteenth-century works are compared to modern and contemporary; the European aesthetic juxtaposed with the American; close-ups paired with distant views; unstaged versus posed; and abstractions alongside images of detailed documentation. To set the tone, a selection of images depicting the subject of people looking at art in museums—by Thomas Struth, Candida Höfer, Andreas Gursky and Robert Polidori—will greet visitors at the entrance to the gallery.

Among the photographers represented are Gustave Le Gray, Francis Firth, Julia Margaret Cameron, Roger Fenton, Eugène Atget, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, László Moholy-Nagy, Man Ray, Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Irving Penn, Lee Friedlander, Garry Winogrand, Ed Ruscha, Joel Sternfeld, Cindy Sherman, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Tina Barney, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Vera Lutter, Vic Muniz, Richard Misrach, Stéphane Couturier and Alec Soth.

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Photo credits: Irene Jaramillo, San Juan Pueblo, ’60 Ford LTD, from The Lowriders, Portraits from New Mexico, ©Meridel Rubenstein

Conversations: Photographs from the Bank of America Collection

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